Kit and Supply Ordering

Please complete the below information and we will ensure you get the kits requested. Please note, all requests are subject to approval. Thank you for trusting us with your patient samples.

    Select Kits and Quantities

    Kits for post-BMT collection

    Post BMT patients require buccal swab testing. Please list the kits you are requesting that should be buccal swab kits.

    Panels
    Tests
    Forms
    Collection Guide
    Education and Publications
    Clinical Trial Services
    Patients

    Panels

    Panel Name STAT Turnaround Time Draw Kit Available (Y/N) Sample Requirement
    COVID-19-associated Thrombotic Microangiopathy (TMA) < 24 hours (7 days a week) No serum
    Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) Genetic Panel (UPDATED) 48 hours (M-F, two consecutive business days required) Yes EDTA whole blood
    TMA-Complete Genetic Panel 48 hours Yes EDTA whole blood
    Hypophosphatasia/Osteogenesis Imperfecta Genetic Panel 48 hours (M-F, two consecutive business days required) Yes EDTA whole blood
    Polycystic Kidney Disease (PKD) Genetic Panel 48 hours (M-F, two consecutive business days required) Yes EDTA whole blood
    PlateletGenex Thrombocytopenia Panel 48 hours (M-F, two consecutive business days required) Yes EDTA Whole Blood
    C3 Glomerulopathy Genetic Panel 48 hours (M-F, two consecutive business days required) Yes EDTA whole blood
    Thrombophilia Genetic Panel 48 hours (M-F, two consecutive business days required) Yes EDTA whole blood
    Factor XIII Genetic Panel 48 hours (M-F, two consecutive business days required) Yes EDTA whole blood
    Dysfibrinogenemia Genetic Panel 48 hours (M-F, two consecutive business days required) Yes EDTA whole blood
    Hemophilia-Complete Severe Bleeding Genetic Panel 48 hours (M-F, two consecutive business days required) Yes EDTA whole blood
    VWD-Complete Genetic Panel 48 hours (M-F, two consecutive business days required) Yes EDTA whole blood
    PlateletGenex Functional Defect Panel 48 hours (M-F, two consecutive business days required) Yes EDTA whole blood
    Alport Syndrome Genetic Panel 48 hours (M-F, two consecutive business days required) Yes EDTA whole blood
    aHUS Genetic Panel 48 hours (M-F, two consecutive business days required) Yes EDTA whole blood
    Prolonged aPTT / PT Evaluation Panel < 24 hours No citrated plasma
    Heparin Antibody Confirmation Panel < 24 hours (M-F) Yes serum
    Mild Bleeding Disorder Panel < 24 hours No citrated whole blood
    Hypercoagulability Panel < 24 hours No citrated plasma
    Lupus Anticoagulant Screen < 24 hours No citrated plasma
    Plavix Sensitivity Panel < 24 hours Yes citrated whole blood
    von Willebrand Factor Profile with Multimer < 5 days No citrated plasma
    Platelet Aggregation Study – Comprehensive < 24 hours No citrated whole blood
    Dysfibrinogenemia Functional Panel < 24 hours No citrated plasma
    Antiphospholipid Syndrome Criteria Panel < 24 hours Yes serum

    Tests

    Test Name STAT Turnaround Time Draw Kit Available (Y/N) Sample Requirement
    COVID-19 Vaccine-Induced Immune Thrombotic Thrombocytopenia (VITT) (PF4 Antibody) < 24 hours (7 days a week) Yes serum
    COVID-19 Antibody, Nucleocapsid (IgG) – Qualitative < 24 hours (Mon. - Fri.) Yes serum
    COVID-19 Antibody, Nucleocapsid (IgG) – Titer < 24 hours (Mon. - Fri.) Yes serum
    COVID-19 Antibody, Spike (IgG) – Qualitative < 24 hours (Mon. - Fri.) Yes serum
    COVID-19 Antibody, Spike (IgG) – Titer < 24 hours (Mon. - Fri.) Yes serum
    Soluble IL-2R alpha (CD25) < 24 hours (7 days a week) No serum
    COVID-19 Diagnostic Genetic Test (mobile) 1-hour (on-site reaction time) Yes saliva swab in VTM, UTM, or DNA/RNA Shield
    COVID-19 Diagnostic Genetic Test 24 hours (M-F) Yes respiratory swab in VTM, UTM, or DNA/RNA Shield
    Familial Genetic Testing Please call. Yes EDTA Whole Blood
    C3 Nephritic Factor (C3NEF) 1 Week No Serum
    Inhibitor Titer (Hemlibra-specific) <24 hours Mon.-Fri. No citrated plasma
    Hemlibra-specific Factor VIII (8) Activity <24 hours Mon.-Fri. No citrated plasma
    Clinical Comments and Consultation from Medical Director < 24 hours No
    Factor VIII (8) Activity – Chromogenic (Bovine reagent) <24 hours Mon.-Fri. (please call) No citrated plasma
    Antiphosphatidylserine Antibody No serum
    sC5b-9 Level 24 hours No EDTA plasma
    Antithrombin III Gene Sequencing 48 hours (M-F, two consecutive business days required) Yes EDTA whole blood
    Factor II Gene Sequencing 48 hours (M-F, two consecutive business days required) Yes EDTA Whole Blood
    Factor V Gene Sequencing 48 hours (M-F, two consecutive business days required) Yes EDTA whole blood
    Factor VIII Gene Sequencing and Factor VIII Inversions Assay 48 hours (M-F, two consecutive business days required) Yes
    PAI-1 Gene Sequencing 48 hours (M-F, two consecutive business days required) Yes EDTA whole blood
    MTHFR Gene Sequencing 48 hours (M-F, two consecutive business days required) No EDTA whole blood
    ADAMTS13 Gene Sequencing 48 hours (M-F, two consecutive business days required) Yes EDTA whole blood
    Plasminogen Gene Sequencing 48 hours (M-F, two consecutive business days required) Yes EDTA whole blood
    Protein C Gene Sequencing 48 hours (M-F, two consecutive business days required) Yes EDTA whole blood
    Protein S Gene Sequencing 48 hours (M-F, two consecutive business days required) Yes EDTA Whole Blood
    Anti-CFH Antibody 48 hours Yes serum
    PFA – Screen (Platelet Function Assessment) < 24 hours No citrated whole blood
    ADAMTS13 Activity < 24 hours (7 days a week) Yes citrated plasma
    Heparin Antibody Confirmation < 24 hours (M-F) Yes serum
    Heparin (UFH) Level < 24 hours No citrated plasma
    Platelet Aggregation Study – Comprehensive < 24 hours No citrated whole blood
    Warfarin Sensitivity Genotype (CYP2C9 and VKORC1) < 1 week No EDTA whole blood
    Thrombin Time < 24 hours No citrated plasma
    Thrombin/Antithrombin Complex < 1 week No citrated plasma
    von Willebrand Factor Antigen < 24 hours No citrated plasma
    von Willebrand Factor Multimer < 5 days No citrated plasma
    PT Mixing Study < 24 hours No citrated plasma
    Reptilase Clotting Time < 1 week No citrated plasma
    Ristocetin Cofactor Activity < 24 hours No citrated plasma
    Ristocetin-induced Platelet Aggregation < 24 hours No citrated whole blood
    Rivaroxaban (Xarelto) Level No citrated plasma
    Russell Viper Venom Time (dilute) < 24 hours No citrated plasma
    Thrombin Generation (normalized-ETP) < 24 hours No citrated plasma
    Protein S Activity < 24 hours No citrated plasma
    Protein S Antigen (Free) < 1 week No citrated plasma
    Protein S Antigen (Total) < 1 week No citrated plasma
    Prothrombin Fragment 1.2 (F1.2) < 1 week No citrated plasma
    Prothrombin Gene Mutation < 24 hours No EDTA whole blood
    Prothrombin Time < 24 hours No citrated plasma
    Plavix Sensitivity – Genotype (CYP2C19 Genotyping) No EDTA whole blood
    Aspirin Sensitivity – LTA (AA-induced Platelet Inhibition) < 24 hours No citrated whole blood
    Ticagrelor Sensitivity – LTA (ADP-induced Platelet Inhibition) < 24 hours citrated whole blood
    Brilinta Sensitivity – LTA (ADP-induced Platelet Inhibition) < 24 hours No citrated whole blood
    Plavix Sensitivity – LTA (ADP-induced Platelet Inhibition) < 24 hours No citrated whole blood
    Protein C Activity < 24 hours No citrated plasma
    Protein C Antigen < 1 week No citrated plasma
    Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor Activity < 10 days No citrated plasma
    Plasminogen Activity < 5 days No citrated plasma
    Plasminogen Antigen < 5 days No citrated plasma
    Platelet Electron Microscopy Study This test is not offered STAT No ACD whole blood
    Platelet Antibody ID – Indirect (GPIIb/IIIa, GP Ib/IX, GPIa/IIa) < 24 hours No serum
    Inhibitor Titer (aPTT Factors) < 24 hours No citrated plasma
    Inhibitor Titer (PT Factors) < 24 hours No citrated plasma
    Lupus Anticoagulant Index < 24 hours No citrated plasma
    MTHFR (A1298C) Gene Mutation < 1 week No EDTA whole blood
    MTHFR (C677T) Gene Mutation < 24 hours No EDTA whole blood
    Heparin Antibody ELISA (reflex) (PF4 Antibody) < 24 hours (7 days a week) Yes serum
    Heparin (LMWH) Level < 24 hours No citrated plasma
    Hexagonal Phospholipid aPTT < 1 week No citrated plasma
    Homocysteine < 5 days No serum
    Factor X (10) Activity < 24 hours No citrated plasma
    Factor X (10) Activity – Chromogenic < 1 week No citrated plasma
    Factor X (10) Antigen < 1 week No citrated plasma
    Factor XI (11) Activity < 24 hours No citrated plasma
    Factor XII (12) Activity < 24 hours No citrated plasma
    Factor XIII (13) Activity – Quantitative < 1 week No citrated plasma
    Fibrinogen Activity < 24 hours No citrated plasma
    Fibrinogen Antigen < 1 week No citrated plasma
    Fondaparinux (Arixtra) Level < 24 hours No citrated plasma
    Dabigatran (Pradaxa) Level < 24 hours No citrated plasma
    Euglobulin Clot Lysis Time < 1 week No citrated plasma
    Factor II (2) Activity < 24 hours No citrated plasma
    Factor V (5) Activity < 24 hours No citrated plasma
    Factor V (5) Leiden Gene Mutation < 24 hours No EDTA whole blood
    Factor VII (7) Activity < 24 hours No citrated plasma
    Factor VIII (8) Activity < 24 hours No citrated plasma
    Factor IX (9) Activity < 24 hours No citrated plasma
    Antithrombin III Activity < 24 hours No citrated plasma
    Antithrombin III Antigen < 1 week No citrated plasma
    aPTT < 24 hours No citrated plasma
    aPTT Mixing Study < 24 hours No citrated plasma
    aPTT-FS (Factor Sensitive Reagent) < 24 hours No citrated plasma
    aPTT-LA (Lupus Sensitive Reagent) < 24 hours No citrated plasma
    aPTT-LA Mixing Study < 24 hours No citrated plasma
    aPTT-FS Mixing Study < 24 hours No citrated plasma
    Beta-2 Glycoprotein I Antibody (IgG, IgM, IgA) < 1 week No serum
    ADAMTS13 Antibody < 3 days Yes citrated plasma
    ADAMTS13 Inhibitor < 24 hours (7 days a week) Yes citrated plasma
    Alpha-2 Antiplasmin Activity < 1 week No citrated plasma
    Anticardiolipin Antibody (IgG, IgM, IgA) < 24 hours No serum
    Activated Protein C – Resistance < 1 week No citrated plasma

    Forms

    Machaon Diagnostics has provided several downloadable documents to assist in ordering, processing and billing. Below please find links to our most frequently requested documents.

    Collection Guide

    Specimen processing is one of the most important aspects in the generation of accurate and reliable lab results. Many variables, such as, anticoagulant ratio, storage time and temperature, and surface of containers and drawing components can affect test results.

    Machaon Diagnostics follows and recommends the use of the third edition of the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (NCCLS) guideline H21-A3: Collection, Transport, and Processing of Blood Specimens for Coagulation Testing and General Performance of Coagulation Assays.

    Please contact the lab with any shipping questions

    Specimen Collection

    Frozen Citrated Plasma
    Frozen citrated plasma is the specimen of choice for clotting assays and some ELISA testing. The anticoagulant used for these assays is 105 – 109 mmol/L, 3.13% – 3.2% of the dihydrate form of trisodium citrate (Na3C6H5O7 2H2O), buffered or nonbuffered.

    Patients with hematocrit values above 55% should have their final citrate concentration corrected using the following equation:

    X = (100 – PCV) / (595 – PCV) WB Volume

    Where X is citrate volume required to prepare a whole blood volume (WB Volume) from a patient with a certain percent packed cell volume (PCV).

    Please follow the listed suggestions for collection of citrated plasma samples.

    • A 1:9 ratio of anticoagulant to whole blood is imperative
    • Blood should be drawn directly into anticoagulant if possible
    • Syringe draws should be added to anticoagulant within 1 minute
    • Syringe draws should use no more that a 20mL volume syringe
    • A two-syringe technique is preferred for syringe draws
    • Coagulation draws should be the 2nd or 3rd tube drawn
    • Catheter draws should be avoided or under the advice of the attending physician
    • All tubes should be inverted at least 4 times to ensure adequate mixing
    • Suitable needle gauges range from 19 – 22 for coagulation and platelet testing
    • Cell-free plasma must contain less than 10,000 platelets/µL
    • Centrifugation should be performed at 1,500 × g for 15 or more minutes
    • Aliquots are frozen (<= -20ºC) promptly to minimize factor degradation
    • Specimens are shipped frozen on dry ice (-78.5ºC)

    Frozen Serum
    Frozen serum is the specimen of choice for most immunoglobulin detecting assays and many ELISA based tests. Whole blood is drawn into a glass or plastic tube possibly containing an activator. Please follow the tube manufacturer’s guidelines for tube handling and processing.

    Please follow the listed suggestions for collection of serum samples.

    • Plastic tubes containing an activator should be inverted at least 4 times
    • Glass tubes without activator should be clotted for 2 hours at room temperature
    • Suitable needle gauges range from 19 – 22 for the serum based tests
    • Centrifugation should be performed at 1,500 × g for 15 or more minutes
    • Aliquots are frozen (<= -20ºC) before shipping and shipped on dry ice (-78.5ºC)

    EDTA Whole Blood
    EDTA anticoagulated whole blood is the specimen of choice for molecular genetic tests.

    Please follow the listed suggestions for collection of genetic samples.

    • Blood should be drawn directly into anticoagulant if possible
    • Extracted DNA is acceptable if received from CLIA-certified labs
    • This must be a closed system draw to prevent contamination
    • All tubes should be inverted at least 4 times to ensure adequate mixing
    • Suitable needle gauges range from 19 – 22 to prevent cell lysis
    • A minimum of 2mL of whole blood is needed for genetic assays
    • No processing is required for this sample type
    • Ship this type of specimen at room temperature

    Aliquoting Specimens
    Submitting multiple aliquots (plasma or serum) for testing is an important aspect of clot, chromogenic and ELISA based tests. Aliquots of 1mL are requested for most of our assays. These should be frozen prior to shipment in a <= -20 C freezer or colder. Tubes should be placed into a rack to ensure the samples are frozen properly in the base of the tube. Freezing should occur within 1 hour of the time of draw. Please refer to the preferred number of aliquots when submitting samples.

    Shipping

    Shipment is a crucial aspect of clinical testing. Please follow the below instructions for easy shipments to the lab.

    Local Shippers
    Machaon Diagnostics contracts with Medical Couriers, Inc. (MCI). who service the entire San Francisco Bay Area and surrounding areas. MCI has a fleet of specially trained drivers that will visit your lab, clinic or office during specified times. Couriers carry dry ice, cold packs and room temperature containers for receipt of all specimen types.

    Medical Couriers, Inc. can be phoned for individual pickup requests at the below number.

    Medical Couriers, Inc.
    (800)-652-1147

    Place prepared samples and order forms in a shipping bag with Machaon and specimen type written in a clear and visible location.

    Out-of-area Shippers
    Please collect the following items:

    • Test Order Form
    • Packing material or newspaper
    • Styrofoam container, possibly with outer cardboard box
    • Packaging tape
    • Airbill for overnight shipments
    • ORM-A label for dry ice shipments (UN1845)
    • Dry ice (-78.5ºC) sufficient for transit time (5lb. per day)
    • Specimens in biohazard specimen transport bag

    Packaging
    Place the biohazard bag containing samples and the test order form into a Styrofoam container followed by dry ice. Fill remaining container space with packaging material and seal with packaging tape. Adhere a completed airbill and dry ice labels to the exterior of container in a visible location. Telephone your preferred overnight courier to request a pickup or place container in designated pickup area.

    Please contact the lab with any shipping questions

    Education and Publications

    Podcasts

    Education

    Antiphospholipid Syndrome: criteria, non-criteria and triple positive testing – a video with Dr. Brad Lewis and Dr. Sciascia.

     

    Platelet Functional Defects, from the clinic to genetics (a webinar given by Dr. Brad Lewis, Feb. 24, 2017)

    Diagnosing Thrombotic Microangiopathies: TTP and atypical HUS: (A Grand Rounds presentation at Mattel Children’s Hospital, UCLA, to Pediatric Nephrology with Dr. Brad Lewis.)

    A guide to the video content:

    00:24 – Introduction (Why we should care about diagnosis of aHUS and TTP)
    1:00 – What is microangiopathic hemolytic anemia (MAHA)?
    1:16 – Blood smear with schistocytes
    1:40 – Von Willebrand’s protein synthesis
    02:09 – ADAMTS-13 and TTP pathophysiology
    02:43 – How to interpret ADAMTS-13 activity testing and advantage of doing ADAMTS-13 activity testing with Machaon Dx
    03:48 – Use of ADAMTS-13 testing to diagnose “Occult” TTP
    04:40 – Ruling in or out aHUS with ADAMTS-13 activity testing
    05:20 – Plasma exchange for aHUS patients
    05:57 – The complement cascade and aHUS pathophysiology
    08:04 –aHUS patients respond to eculizumab therapy
    08:45 – Unlike TTP, aHUS has triggers in 70% of cases
    09:26 – aHUS is a multisystem microvascular disease (aHUS-induced organs damage)
    10:09 – aHUS presentation
    11:41 – Can we differentiate TTP and aHUS clinically?
    12:15 – 5 reasons why you should care about aHUS patients genotyping
    14:17 – Advantage of doing aHUS genetic testing with Machaon Dx
    14:52 – The punchline: aHUS and TTP diagnosis algorithm

    Publications

    Shapiro, AD. et al. Plasminogen replacement therapy for the treatment of children and adults with congenital plasminogen deficiency. Blood. 2018;131(12):1301–1310.

    Stromsness B. et al. Physician Interpretation of Equivocal Results for aHUS Genetic Testing Varies Greatly and is Frequently at Odds with Laboratory Views. J Clin Apheresis. 2019; (abstract P-82).

    Ero, MP, Kain, JS, inventors; Machaon Diagnostics, Inc., assignee. 2018 Dec 18. Method of diagnosis of complement-mediated thrombotic microangiopathies. United States patent US 10,155,983.

    Tao J. et al. A rare case of Alport syndrome, atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome and Pauci-immune crescentic glomerulonephritis. BMC Nephrology. 2018;19:355.

    Kain J. et al. Additional Genes Associated with Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome. ASN 2018 Abstract TH-PO713. 2018; (abstract).

    Switala L. et al. Complement factor abnormalities detected in patients with suspected Heparin-induced Thrombocytopenia (HIT) but not in Thrombotic Thrombocytopenia Purpura (TTP). ISLH 2017 Abstract Proceedings. 2017; (abstract).

    Ipe T. et al. An extremely rare splice site mutation in the gene encoding complement factor I in a patient with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. J Clin Apheresis. 2017;32(6):584-588.

    Alge J. et al. Hemolytic uremic syndrome as the presenting manifestation of WT1 mutation and Denys-Drash syndrome: a case report. BMC Nephrology. 2017;18(1): 243.

    Zhang K. et al. Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome: a brief review. Hematology Reports. 2017;9(2):7053.

    Jensen G. et al. Consumption of nattokinase is associated with reduced blood pressure and von Willebrand factor, a cardiovascular risk marker: resultd from a randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter North American clinical trial. Integrated Blood Pressure Control. 2016;9:95-104.

    Stromsness B. et al. Perceived clinical utility of ADAMTS-13 testing decreases quickly when turnaround time extends beyond two days. Int J Lab Hematol. 2015; (abstract).

    Ero M. et al. Novel variant detection is essential when attempting to genetically confirm the clinical diagnosis of complement-mediated thrombotic microangiopathies (TMA). J Clin Apheresis. 2015; (abstract O-09).

    Harbert J. et al. Inhibitory effects of fish oil on platelet-associated thrombin generation as measured by the calibrated automated thrombogram: an in vitro study. Int Soc Thromb Hemost 2014; (abstract 604).

    Ero M. et al. Impact of telavancin on prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time as determined using point-of-care coagulometers. J Thromb Thrombolysis. 2013;38(2):235-240.

    Beattie DT. Et al. An in vitro investigation of the cardiovascular effects of the 5-HT4 receptor selective agonists, Velusetrag and TD-8954. J Thromb Thrombolysis. Vascular Pharmacology. 2013;58:150–156.

    Ero M. et al. A pilot study on the serum pharmacokinetics of nattokinase in humans following a single oral daily dose. Alternative Therapies. 2013;19(3): 18-21.

    Higgins D. et al. The inability of tegaserod to affect platelet aggregation and coronary artery tone at supratherapeutic concentrations. Archives of Pharmacology. 2012;385(1):103-9.

    Ng C. et al. Oral bioavailability of nattokinase (NSK-SD). Am J Clin Pathol. 2010;134(suppl):11.

    Lakshmi P. et al. Flavocoxid, an anti-inflammatory agent of botanical origin, does not affect coagulation or interact with anticoagulation therapies. Adv Ther. 2010;27(7):1-12.

    Jeske WP. et al. Isolation and characterization of heparin from tuna skins. Clin Appl Thromb Hemost. 2007 Apr;12(2):137-45.

    Fareed D. et al. Nitric oxide levels are upregulated in patients with malignancy-associated hypercoagulable state. Int J Lab Hematol. 2005; (abstract).

    Jeske WP. et al. A survey of venous thrombosis models. Methods Mol Med. 2004;93:221-37.

    Sahud et al. von Willebrand factor-cleaving protease inhibitor in a patient with human immunodeficiency syndrome-associated thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura. Br J Haematol. 2002; 116(4):909-911.

    Fenton JW. et al. Statin drugs and dietary isoprenoids downregulate protein prenylation in signal transduction and are antithrombotic and prothrombolytic agents. Biochemistry. 2002;67(1):85-91.

    Ero M. et al. Comparative effects of a novel sulfated pentamannan oligosaccaride mixture (PI-88), heparin and related agents on the tissue factor-induced platelet activation and aggregation profile in whole blood. Thromb Haemost. 2001; (abstract 6260).

    Ero M. et al. An antiplatelet drug, ticlopidine, inhibits heparin-induced thrombocytopenia responses as measured by platelet aggregometry and 14C serotonin release. Thromb Haemostasis. 1997; (abstract).

    Clinical Trial Services

    Machaon Diagnostics is a clinical reference laboratory, specializing in the diagnosis and monitoring of coagulation, platelet, rare disease and genetics. What makes us unique is our ability to provide high quality custom testing with unmatched speed.

    • Our Mission is to save more lives with lab tests.

    Since 2003, we have grown into a team of clinicians, scientists, consultants and technologists bringing over 400 years of aggregated expertise to the field of laboratory medicine.

    Our areas of clinical expertise include: Rare Disease Genetics, Advanced Hemostasis, (Platelets and Coagulation), Complement Disorders, Nephrology, Hematology / Oncology, Ophthalmology, Cardiology, Immunology, and Medical Devices.

    Our esoteric and additional routine testing menu applies to a wide variety of disorders and clinical situations and, therefore, draws attention from both a national and an international clientele. Our clients include university medical centers, health system networks, community hospitals, commercial and research laboratories, doctor’s offices, biotechnology firms and pharmaceutical companies of all sizes.

    CRO Services

    Machaon Diagnostics provides a rapid and complete solution for companies in need of clinical trial services, contract research and independent marketing claim validation.  We have been performing studies on pharmaceuticals and medical devices since 2003. Design, subject recruitment, sample collection/storage, testing, statistical analysis, study reporting and manuscript preparation are all included in our comprehensive service. We have an extensive database of well-characterized study volunteers, allowing us to complete some IRB-approved clinical trials in as little as 5 weeks. Our subject database includes normal adult, rare disease, elevated risk of cardiovascular disease, high blood pressure, metabolic syndrome and other populations. We frequently collaborate with our larger CRO partners to aid in global clinical trials.

    Research & Development

    Machaon Diagnostics is the largest independent specialized coagulation lab in the US. We are a privately-owned company, staffed by MDs, PhDs, licensed clinical laboratory scientists (CLSs) and medical technologists.

    As a clinical lab, we provide a unique testing environment for evaluating thrombotic and fibrinolytic potential. Pharmaceutical, device and biotech compounds and materials can be studied within established, validated and controlled clinical assays with verified reference ranges. Our clinical tests are further controlled within our quality assurance and proficiency testing policies and procedures. All tests can be modified or re-designed for best-fit analysis.

    The Machaon Diagnostics laboratory facility is located on a medical center campus in Oakland, California with a second lab site in New Orleans, Louisiana. Our scientists are published in and passionate about the field of laboratory medicine.

    Assay Development

    Our staff has had extensive experience designing unique testing systems or applying the proper testing system to answer the clinical trial questions quickly and accurately.

    Custom-built assays, from ELISAs to NGS, from Sanger to Flow Cytometry, from TEG to Electrophoresis, we build custom assays to complement our pre-existing testing capabilities to fit your testing needs.

    Machaon Diagnostics is a multi-state licensed, CLIA-accredited, College of American Pathologists (CAP)-accredited clinical laboratory authorized to provide high complexity clinical laboratory services. All laboratory testing is controlled within our Quality Assurance Program and studies are offered in a Good Laboratory Practices (GLP, 21CFR Part 58)/ EN 13612 environment.

    Please contact the laboratory to inquire about any of these services.

    Why the name, Machaon?

    Machaon (pronounced may-chay-on) is a character from Homer’s Iliad (800 B.C.) and a key figure in the Trojan War. Described as a warrior, surgeon and healer, Machaon was revered for saving the lives of Menelaus, King of Sparta, husband Helen, and that of Philoctetes, the famed Achaean leader. Under the direction of King Agamemnon, Machaon saved these and many other warriors during the fierce Greek and Trojan War.

    Patients

    What you need to know

    If you are reading this page, it likely means your doctor has ordered a bleeding or clotting test for you and would like you to get this test run at Machaon Diagnostics. Machaon Diagnostics is a clinical reference lab specializing in bleeding and clotting testing, one of the few independent coagulation labs in the country. We run very specific, unique blood tests which are often critical in helping doctors determine the correct course of treatment.

    Machaon Diagnostics provides specialized lab testing to hospitals and doctors all over the country and is recognized for the speed and quality of our testing.

    It is important to know that your insurance may or may not cover your testing. We have a long track record of working with patients to ensure they get the testing they need and we will work with you to help find a solution should your insurance not cover the testing we would provide.

    If you are coming in to Machaon for a test, here are some things you will need to have with you:

    • Your doctors lab order
    • Your insurance information
    • Your identification
    • A list of your current medications
    • If you are coming in for a Platelet Aggregation, please remember you must fast before this test.

    Machaon Diagnostics was founded in 2003 and is a California-licensed, CLIA-accredited, College of American Pathologists (CAP)-accredited clinical laboratory authorized to provide high complexity clinical laboratory services. All laboratory testing is controlled within our Quality Assurance Program and studies are offered in a Good Laboratory Practices (GLP, 21CFR Part 58)/ EN 13612 environment.

    Please contact the laboratory if you have questions.